Posts Tagged ‘2012’

Is there any doubt I went to the right university? I think not:

A discussion with an anthropologist? Check. Science fiction writers? Check and check (Joe Haldeman and Nancy Kress). There’s even going to be a whole panel on Wednesday, with a religious studies and chemistry professors thrown in for good measure.

Favorite quote: “The ancient Maya calendar is like an odometer on a new car: When it hits its maximum, it goes back to zero. A new cycle begins.”

For more information, see “USF series to explore 2012 apocalypse theory, feature fiction apocalypse authors” in The Tampa Bay Times.

Oh, if only I could go…

Porn bunker

Posted: January 9, 2012 in Uncategorized
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Imagine my surprise when I began to read the delightful New York Times interview with Stephen Colbert, tackling such things as his background and how the show’s writing process is “extravagantly wasteful.” Colbert likes to say, “Let’s make it perfect and then cut it.”

Then — do my eyes deceive?

Other promising bits abandoned recently were one about a porn bunker developed by some adult filmmakers in anticipation of the Mayan doomsday prophecy

Wait? What? There’s something like that?

I go to Google faster than a zombie shambles toward a post-apocalyptic straggler.

Uh, file this under “not surprising,” but the website is Not Safe For Work. However, should your curiosity get the better of you after hours, this quote made me giggle:

According to Pink Visual spokesman Quentin Boyer, the bunker is envisioned as “far more than a mere bomb shelter or subterranean survivalist enclave,” adding that the company “intends to ride out the 2012 apocalypse in style.”

Ride out. Hehehehe.

Our goal is nothing less than to survive the apocalypse to come in comfort and luxury, whether that catastrophe takes the form of fireballs flung Earthward by an all-seeing deity, extended torrential rainfall, Biblical rapture, an earthquake-driven mega-tsunami, radioactive flesh-eating zombies, or some combination of the above. We also intend to maintain our website update schedule throughout the ordeal, even if those websites are only available on the bunkers self-contained local network by that time.”

While Boyer conceded that building the bunker is “obviously a major undertaking” he said he remains confident that Pink Visual will complete all major construction by September, 2012, and that the bunker will be fully operational well before the end of the “Great Cycle” tracked by the Mayan Calendar Stone.

I mean, I couldn’t even make something like this up! Can’t you imagine the kind of wild solstice party they’re going to have in there? I mean, what are they going to call this place for short, a porker?

So, mark the date on the calendar. The apocalypse has officially zoomed by the mainstream to become ubiquitous when even porn stars worry about doomsday.

Reader rift

Posted: January 5, 2012 in Uncategorized
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What do Cuban Santerian priests think about 2012? (Wait, are we taking a global poll here?)

Doing a quick search on Google, you could come away with one of two conclusions:

A. Santeria priests: Doom in 2012!

B. Santeria priests: Year for cataclysms, but it’s not the end of the world

So you probably already know which one The Associated Press distributed – without even clicking on the links – but is it more fun? I know which one would probably draw more page views… After all, Armageddon is big business!

(And, no, I’m not making anything off this blog. Leading my husband to ask, “So why are you doing this?” He also wants me to amend what I wrote about being very skeptical.)

See, two people will read the same information two different ways. Form your own opinion. And, yes, I totally am skeptical. Mostly.

OK, so I really was going to move past the Maya and 2012 because there are other really interesting doomsday scenarios like extreme solar flares. (This is where some doomspeakers would pretend not to have read the part in the article that says, “There’s no reason to think this solar maximum will be worse than any seen before.”)

However, the interesting “Maya 2012” tidbits keep drawing me in…

Mayan 2012 Calendar: Doomsday December 21? Scientists Offer New Reassurances – ABC News.

Tulum, Mexico.

“He/she/it arrives.”

If you read the article I mentioned yesterday, you’ll remember there was a second glyph found in Mexico that mentions 2012 and something arriving or coming from the sky.

I find this interesting because the image I took of the Temple of the Frescoes, above, in Tulum, contains a stucco relief of what is known as the Descending God (or Diving God), who was associated with rain, lightning, the setting sun and planet Venus. Notice also the creepy hand prints (with some hands having six or seven fingers) done in red paint that are still visible.

Our tour guide, a Maya, explained that people asked him all the time whether this was “proof” that aliens visited. (He didn’t think too much of this.) However, that’s not the only theory out there.

  • A newsletter from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (LDS) says these Latin American sites are proof that Jesus visited the Native Americans (using scripture from The Book of Mormon: 2 Nephi 25:20 as backup).

  • Another website proclaims “Evidence of Christ in Tulum!” While also mentioning the LDS tradition, it says two things prove Jesus’ influence: “the temple complex itself and the second is the symbol of the red hands.”
  • We’ll leave aside how many other religions have ascending and descending wordage and how it might sound to say the Maya couldn’t have possibly developed by themselves.

    I’ll just end with a real Maya explaining, in what no doubt is the first of many, many, many 2012 articles to come:

    “For them (2012)’s a joyous event, not an apocalyptic event. What is coming is the end of a calendar and the beginning of a new one.

    “It’s cyclical,” (Mayan expert Leonzo Barreno) told CBC. “This has happened before. According to the elders it’s the fifth time it’s happened.”

    Happy New Year!

    Posted: January 2, 2012 in Uncategorized
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    New Year’s Day always involved beef stew, rice and tomatoes, and black-eyed peas for me. Sure, there might be a resolution or two, but for the past few years, none — not because “the End of Days” is coming — but because I wanted to focus on living well day-by-day. That includes writing more and having fun.

    Since I’ve brought up 2012, let’s have at it, because this blog will help me to achieve those aforementioned goals.

    Why 2012? Why not? Mayan glyphs found in Mexico, one in the Tortuguero site and another more recently in Comalcalco, mention December 21, 2012. It’s the end of the Long Count calendar that began in 3114 B.C.E. You can read more about the date and glyphs in this well-written Associated Press article by Mark Stevenson. I particularly like the mention of, “He/she/it will descend from the sky.”

    Why use the name “Doomaday”? I intended to share a new apocalyptic theory daily, but I thought that would get old. I’ll still share theories when I find interesting ones, but I’ll also follow them up with commentary, video clips and other things I think people might want to read.

    Do you seriously believe that nonsense? I am very skeptical. I suspect the end of the Long Count calendar rolls over on Dec. 22. I was fortunate enough to work with a man who is Maya and speaks the language. He couldn’t stand hearing all the theories. (Neither can my husband, but he’s learned to just roll his eyes and sigh whenever I turn to the History channel.) That said, I keep an open mind, and I’d like to post all things “apocalyptic” here.

    So, it’s more than just 2012 stuff? Oh, absolutely. Why restrain ourselves? On a more serious note, natural and man-made disasters (see: Japan 2011) and societal collapse (Arab Spring 2011) are very real. I also think that Americans as a whole have gotten soft. Before you sputter in indignation, let’s be honest: Very few of us have the skills our grandparents did. I’ve gone a week without power — thanks ’04 hurricanes — so I’m well aware that it would be very difficult for us if something disrupted our “on demand” supermarket culture or power grid. It only makes sense to be prepared for natural disasters, job loss or even worst-case scenarios like terrorism.

    May I send you links? Sure, send information to mimsguard[hyphen]doom[at]yahoo[dot]com, and I’ll link back to you.

    What are your credentials? I have years of journalism and editing experience, having worked in newspapers, magazines and online, which means I know how to figure out what’s important and when to cut out anything extraneous or false. (That said, we can still discuss some of the sure-to-be false theories.) I love writing fiction and can think up how different apocalyptic scenarios could occur. I’m a history buff and minored in political science, which isn’t surprising since my father spent 35 years as a history teacher (and undoubtedly indoctrinated me). I also have traveled to “apocalyptic” destinations, meaning where some say the cultures have predicted the end of days (Mexico, Israel).

    After watching History, I wondered aloud one night about how one becomes an “alien-astronaut theorist.”

    My husband said, “Just come up with a theory.”

    So, although I don’t have a Ph.D., I think I can become a “doomsday blogger” rather painlessly. Unless, of course, the Apocalypse occurs. Then, I’ll wonder why I wasted so much time blogging when I should have been moving off the grid.

    Are you mocking or lecturing us? Hopefully, I’ll fall between humorous and practical. We’ll still have our fun, but if it spurs people to think “What would I do?” then that’s even better.